Multimedia Occupy Wall Street Opinions

Brophy’s stance on the 99 percent should preach acceptance not exclusion

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By Joe Skoog ’13
The Roundup

“We are the 99 percent.”

While the Occupy Wall Street movement may have far reaching effects on the United States, many do not know what the idea of being the “99 percent” entails The Occupy Wall Street movement sprung up in response to what their website calls, “The Arab Spring, which gave rise to the European Summer, and finally continues on into the American Spring.”

For students and teachers at Brophy, the 99 percent ideal stands for different things.

According to CNN Money Times, the one percent is those who currently earn $343, 927 a year.

While most Brophy students do not meet this criterion I can’t help but feel the mentality of being the one percent still pervades this institution.

However this does not mean our status can dictate our response to the 99 percent of people.

“We have an obligation to promote the truth, beauty and goodness of all human life,” said Christian Ethics teacher Mr. Jim Grindey.

Prioritizing the one percent above the 99 percent goes against our Catholic teaching.

“We should prioritize preferential treatment for those who are less fortunate than us,” Mr. Grindey said.

“The Brophy motto of being a ‘Man for Others’ should mean that we should be more inclusive and more welcoming of the 99 percent,” said AP English III teacher Mr. Tom Danforth ’78.

The feelings of these teachers are echoed by students.

“While I am a member of the one percent, I refuse to not attempt to fight economic and social inequality.  As an active and informed citizen, I feel it is my duty to perform these kind of actions,” said Andrew McCoy ’12.

As Men for Others, students at Brophy have been striving to help the 99 percent and feel there is a greater sense of awareness regarding the problems that the Occupy Wall Street movement has brought up to the surface, including economic disparity and social injustice.

“While there are many students who are the one percent at Brophy, it is important to remember that some students are not as fortunate. We should not make blanket statements about people who are the 99 percent,” McCoy said.

Sweeping generalizations regarding the manner and motives of the 99 percent are counterproductive and do not allow us to recognize the real problems that are coming to light.

Regardless of our views on the Occupy Wall Street movement, the issues they bring to our attention necessitate increased help because of our duty to be a Man for Others, as St. Ignatius said.

Updated Jan. 18 with audio version.