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New teacher Rosenzweig exhibits passion for mathematics

New faculty member teaches advanced class in linear algebra and real analysis

By Aakash Jain ’14
THE ROUNDUP

“I was attracted to the idea of teaching because … I thought it might be interesting to teach talented and motivated high school students,” said Mr. Matthew Rosenzweig, the newest and youngest math teacher on campus.

After graduating a year early from Harvard University, Mr. Rosenzweig, a Phoenix Country Day School alumnus, decided to return for a year to his native state.

Mr. Rosenzweig teaches a unique class at Brophy called “Advanced Topics in Mathematical Theory,” which covers concepts ranging from linear algebra to real analysis.

“I really enjoy the class. I love talking to Mr. Rosenzweig about math,” said Andrew Salmon ’14, one of the students in the class.

“It is very interesting. I feel like we have learned many new things, and the teacher is full of knowledge,” said Alexander Chang ’15, another student.

Mr. Rosenzweig was first attracted to pure mathematics in his freshman year at Harvard.

“I took an advanced math class that’s the inspiration in large part for the course I’m teaching now. I really fell in love with proving theorems. I really enjoy doing that,” Mr. Rosenzweig said. “After my first semester, I was pretty convinced that I was going to concentrate in math. I couldn’t see myself doing anything else.”

After he became aware of an opening in Brophy’s mathematics department, Mr. Rosenzweig decided the opportunity was worth looking into.

“I was really pleased with my visits with Mr. (Jim) Bopp and Mr. (Bob) Ryan,” Mr. Rosenzweig said. “I wanted to make things happen and so did they. So it came to be that I would teach at Brophy for a year.”

In his free time, Mr. Rosenzweig said he enjoys exercising, cooking and reading, but his true passion remains mathematics.

“(In my free time) I do more math. I can’t seem to help myself,” Mr. Rosenzweig said. “I’m always working on some sort of mathematical thing.

After this year, Mr. Rosenzweig said he hopes to attend graduate school and earn a doctorate in mathematics. After that, his career plans are still undecided, though he has interest in pursuing a profession in business.

“I’m leaning towards something that’s non-academic because I like the business model of solving problems and the idea of raising capital and having to be competitive to implement your solution,” Mr. Rosenzweig said. “I’ve always had somewhat of an attraction to business, so I’d like to blend my love for mathematics with something entrepreneurial.”