Opinions

Daily announcements are redundant, not especially helpful

By Charles Louis Dominguez ’14
THE ROUNDUP 

At approximately 11:10 a.m. each day, the intercom system awakens and everyone on Brophy’s campus is greeted with a very familiar catchphrase: Good morning, Broncos, please quiet down for today’s daily announcements.

With the flurry of activities and happenings around campus, it makes sense that we take time out of our day to acknowledge them.

However, it seems this year the daily announcements are more in depth than a mere helpful reminder of important, remarkable events around campus.

Nowadays, it seems as though everything is commented upon with in-depth detail.

To shorten the announcements would improve the efficacy and impact that they have.

The purpose of announcements is to update students and inform them of activities and achievements they might otherwise be unaware of.

The increasing length of the announcements undermines their intention, as everything on campus is treated with the same level of importance.

If everything is important, then nothing is.

At this point, it isn’t a rare occasion to observe students zoning out for the duration of the announcements, waiting for the intercom to shut off and classes to proceed.

Mr. Pete Burr ’07 helps to select those who deliver the announcements, but the content delivered is ultimately determined by the reader.

Mr. Burr offered his own view towards the length of the announcements as well as their current state:

“I don’t know if I necessarily agree that they’re increasing in length,” Mr. Burr said. “There are definitely days where I feel like they’re long, but there are other days where I feel like the guys do a good job of reading what they believe is important to the students and that they get just enough content across.”

As a junior, I have listened to the announcements over the past three years.

This year is just seems as though they go on for too long.

“It’s not a consistent increasing length, in my opinion, but there are definitely days where they go a little long,” Mr. Burr said.

Still, I vote for a shorter cap across the board. In this case, less can be more.