Entertainment Movies

‘The Breakfast Club’ offers heartfelt message, genuine characters

Revisiting the Classics

“The Breakfast Club”– starring Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy
9 out of 10

By Chase L. Manson ’16
THE ROUNDUP

During the 1980s, the John Hughes’s coming-of-age comedies began to achieve popularity.

Some of these films included hits such as “Ferris Buller’s Day Off,” “Pretty in Pink” and “The Breakfast Club.”

Even though “The Breakfast Club” was filmed in the ’80s, it has a quintessential and timeless quality to it.

The characters are universal; we have all had encounters with these types of personalities and egos.

This is why the movie works, we have had personal experiences with these characters and what they stand for.

Without spoiling too much, the basic premise is that a group of diverse students all find themselves in Saturday detention. Over the course of the film, the characters learn about who they are and how they perceive others.

The acting is very good. They act with the right amount of precision and emotion.

Sometimes the acting is not top notch, but for young actors it is very impressive.

Although the narrative is very clever, the plot has it shortcomings. It is cliché and overused but luckily, that’s not the film’s focus.

The focus is on the students and each has an equal amount of time for character development.

The characters are the reason the movie so good.

The comedy is very unique. Since it is an older film, some of the dialogue can seem archaic, but the main source of laughter is in the actions.

Since we are familiar with these archetypes, the audience knows what actions they will take. This is how comedy is intertwined, the very generic actions are funny because of the personalities.

In the end, “The Breakfast Club” is a good movie with  memorable characters. Go check it out for yourself on Netflix, and relive the magic of the ’80s.