Entertainment Music

Students, teachers use music to concentrate, create environment

By Carter Santini ’15
THE ROUNDUP

Sound surrounds us constantly whether it is the buzzing of an air conditioning, birds chirping, people talking or music.

Most of the time people view sound as a distraction, but in the case of studying and working, students and teachers both find music a helpful tool.

According to a study at John Hopkins University, music in education helps eliminate stress, focus concentration and energize learning activity in the brain.

Many students agree that music helps with studying.

 “If I’m doing math, I can listen to anything, but if it’s English then it has to be calm,” said Jack Werner ’15.

Werner’s study playlist is filled with ODEZSA and The Drums. He said that their music creates the best environment for him to get work done.

Ross Johnson ’15 said he likes a slow tempo as well, but prefers more atmospheric music.

“The more atmospheric it is, the better it is for me to really focus,” Johnson said.

Johnson recommends Explosions in the Sky and the pre-made playlist on Spotify called Deep Focus.

Tucker Brown ’17 said he thinks any modern or electric music is too distracting while studying. His choice artist for studying is Yo Yo Ma.

Teachers use music as a tool to enhance focus in their classrooms.

English teacher Mr. Tom Danforth ’78 plays classical music to build a calming environment in his classroom, especially during tests.

“Sometimes I would put on reggae in class and I would see kids getting into it,” he said. “So I think the music really has to be in the background.”

Mr. Danforth said he was inspired to put on classical music from one of his teachers, the Rev. Anton Renna, SJ. It helped him so he decided to use it for his classes.

Mr. Danforth said when he works he will usually put on CNN or something in the background and not focus on it too much.