Defining School Spirit News

Transfer students see spirit beyond sports

By Gabe Morrison ’17
THE ROUNDUP

Though most students take pride in school spirit, to many, a lack of a lack of compared experience makes it is hard to gage the quality of Brophy’s spirit.

Transfer students are unique in they have spent time on two different campuses,.

Milo Charbel ’15, who transferred from Notre Dame Preparatory after freshman year, said the fit of Brophy was much better for him.   

“The academics were great… but I didn’t fit in there and I didn’t like it,” Charbel said.

Charbel said that spirit among Notre Dame students was also strong, but it was limited by strict policies placed upon them by school administration.

“I know their seniors are pretty into their high school spirit, but it’s sort of on the down low,” Charbel said.

In comparison, Charbel said that Brophy school spirit was much larger.

“It’s much bigger. It’s much more elaborate. I can see much more people intrinsically living out Brophy’s ‘Grad at Grad’ and ideals in and out of school even if they don’t know it,” Charbel said.

Charbel also said that Brophy felt much more like a family in comparison to Notre Dame.

Transfer student Ben Ehman ’16 also said he also saw Brophy spirit involving students living out Jesuit ideals.

“I think that the emphasis put on being ‘Men for Others,’ regardless of religion… but just the fact that your going out of your way to be better to be a better person,” Ehman said.

Ehman contrasted Brophy to his old school, Belmont Hill School in Boston, Mass., where he knew most of people at his 300 person school.

“At Brophy though I don’t know everybody, the people I do know, I know very well and I’ve been able to become good friends with people very quickly,” Ehman said.

Ehman said the mottos of his old school where intellect, foresight and quick-wittedness, all which had nothing to do with being good people, just being smart and doing things that help yourself.

Trevor McNamara ’17, a transfer student from Morristown-Beard School in Morristown, NJ., said that though service hours were required at his old school, Brophy’s volunteering has more of an emphasis on community.

“There was a certain amount of hours that we had to do, and we did them on their own. But I definitely prefer the Loyola Project because we got to know the kids,” McNamara said.

In terms of sports attendance, McNamara said that students at Morristown-Beard School also were supporters of big sports, especially football, lacrosse, soccer and baseball.

When comparing the Morristown-Beard, McNamara said that Brophy was unique in the amount of people that went to dances and events like the Band-Slam, but it was not unique in other events.

“Friday Night Lights, that’s exactly the same,” McNamara said.