How do you learn? News

Student jobs prove great experience despite setbacks

By Tyler Conrad ’17
THE ROUNDUP

Job experiences for students can provide a good way to get acclimated to real-world business, despite being time-consuming commitments.

Students with jobs are taking the initiative to make their own money in the world, even if it means sacrificing some of their time.

Ben Shein ’17 says his job at North restaurant on 44th Street and Camelback has taught him about the restaurant industry and also business economics in general.

“I’ve learned a lot of things to help prepare me later in life for certain work situations. It’s truly benefited me and I feel a sense of accomplishment,” Shein said in an email to The Roundup. Shein has been employed at the Fox restaurant for nearly a year, working two to three shifts a week.

Counselor Ms. Kalli Vaughan said that maintaining a job can also be helpful from a college admissions standpoint.

“Having a job can indicate a certain level of responsibility to the colleges. I have read some pretty great college essays based on a student’s work experience,” Ms. Vaughan said.

However, what after-school jobs make-up for in work experience and resume-building, they take away from other activities, as well as social life and in extreme cases even academic performance.

“You definitely need to plan out your week beforehand and be really organized,” said Sam P. Harris ’17, who was also employed at a Fox restaurant this year before taking time off for lacrosse season.

Harris, who played for Varsity 2 last year, maintained his job during the off season to accumulate some spending and saving money. Shein said he hopes to retain the position during lacrosse with limited hours and more emphasis on weekends.

This is a common pattern amongst employed students, to vacate their positions with the hopes of returning when their schedule is freed up again.

“My general manager had told me that he’d be happy to hire me back once I am ready to work again, so I am really appreciative to know that,” Harris said.

Still, the task of being able to go back and forth between commitments requires some understanding and patience on both sides.

“If a student wants a job, they will need to invest their time and energy into a job search and show perseverance,” Ms. Vaughan. “This kind of commitment can be annoying, but necessary and well worth it in the end.”

This commitment is often accompanied by assistance from peers and those one works with.

“It is all based upon the relationship you create with your manager and co-workers,” Shein said.

Outside of the restaurant industry, Michael Winter ’17 said that he agrees that while jobs have great perks, they also have great setbacks.

“Most of my co-workers are college students so they have much more flexible schedules,” Winter said of his job at the Hyatt Regency Resort.

Whether it be taking time off due to another commitment, or missing out on a social event, every job has its limits workers must learn to work with.

“You have to make sacrifices at the end of the day. After working at North for a year, I’ve managed to successfully and equally balance my work and social life so there are not as many problems anymore,” Shein said.