Music

Rihanna displays artistic growth, lack of coherence

‘ANTi’ by Rihanna
7 out of 10

By Chase L. Manson ’16
THE ROUNDUP

Rihanna has always been one of those hit and miss artists, balancing between decent singles with anxious songs.

After taking a much needed break of releasing an album every year, Rihanna returns two years later with “ANTi.”

And just like her career, the album has hits and it has misses,  but overall proves to be a successful entry into her canon.

The album is unlike any Rihanna has made. It’s not full of her party-club; hits instead she trades this for a more brooding tone.

This is demonstrated with songs such as “Close to You” and “Higher.”

Rihanna’s vocals definitely aid these tracks and surprisingly, her voice has matured nicely. It’s not a great voice by any means, but it holds it’s own and adds a nice touch on the tracks.

Her vocals are greatly aided by fantastic production. This is exemplified with “Kiss it Better,” which uses electric guitars so effectively, as well as “Woo,” which has a Kanye West industrial influence.

It’s clear to the listener that Rihanna has reached an apex in her career and it’s nice to see her grow as an artist.

But this new Rihanna can definitely rub someone the wrong way, which is the case for me.

I can appreciate this new direction but the album lacks an overall theme or concept. When an artist grows up it is imperative that they maintain some sense of image.

Here, I know this is ironic but, it’s very anti-Rihanna. When I listen to this album I don’t hear Rihanna, I hear some else.

That’s not just an image change, it’s just going into such a 180 it feels upsetting.

However, the album does pull through with it’s unique style and the new Rihanna is good but it does leave the listener wanting more.

For a good production value, nice vocals but an empty message,”ANTi” gets a 7 out of 10.