Entertainment Music

Music Videos need to be fresh, rather than derivative

By Chase Manson ’16
THE ROUNDUP

In the 1980s the music video was the end all be all.

It was the glory days of MTV.

From Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” to the endless work of Queen, the music video was the best medium for an artist to display their craft.

However, lately music videos have not been as consistent. They focus more on glamour shots and quickly flashy routines, instead of telling a cohesive narrative.

One of the best examples of this is Iggy Azalea’s and Britney Spears video for “Pretty Girls.”

Instead of focusing on a narrative, it trades that it for flashy cars, forced dance routines and of course product placement.

Oh, product placement. Hello darkness my old friend.

Product placement is one of the reasons videos have lost their quality.

Almost every video has some shoutout to Beats by Dre or another operation.

This aspect relates to the ubiquitous nature that marketing has on society and it is really strangling artists creativity, not letting them make the video they want to make.

Say what you will about Kanye West but he had a point. Beyonce’s “Single Ladies” video was of high quality.

The cinematography is great and the angles the director uses demonstrates a depth of camera knowledge.

The choreography was fantastic and fast pace, it didn’t feel forced, it was genuine and natural.

When watching the video, you get the feeling Team Beyonce got to make the video they wanted to.

They were in control.

Audiences want something new, something that challenges. Music videos and the medium does that.

There needs to be that one spark, something that captures the heart and soul audiences are craving.

We need a revolution, a talented artist who has a distinct vision.

I call on all artists to challenge their fans, give them something unexpected and please leave Beats by Dre out it.