Sports

Players, administration prefer student section to cheer not jeer

Photo by Raymond Link ’20 | Mason Koko ’19 motivates the crowd during the Hoopcoming basketball game on Jan. 18.

Luke Odden ’21

THE ROUNDUP

Are Brophy students coming to sporting events to cheer or jeer?

Students that were in attendance at the Hoopcoming game last year know how intense the game can get for the players and the fans. What can start as a cheer for intentions to cheer for Brophy can quickly become what is known as a jeer.

Jeering is known as the loud and obnoxious cheering against the opposing team or the other team’s fan base. Chants like, “overrated” and “scoreboard” when chanted at the other team can be considered jeer.

Jeering is easiest to see at basketball games. One reason for this is the proximity of the fans. The size of the court allows for an easier line of communication between the fans and the players.

Jeering at the opposing team during a game can produce positive outcomes for the Broncos, however, it can also give the opposition more motivation to beat the Broncos.

Cheering, on the other hand, brings an intensity that the Brophy players love. “I would rather have Brophy cheer us on rather than heckle the opponent. When the Red Army is loud and supportive of our team, it gives us another level of energy that has a profound effect on the game,” said Alec Owen ’19, forward for the Brophy varsity basketball team.

When asked about the effect of jeering against our own players, basketball Head Coach Mr. Matt Hooten stated, “I think a lot of times it gives our players energy.” He then went on to say that he believes our fans should stay away from chanting anything about an “individual player.”

Mr. Hooten gave an example of why jeering an individual player can have a negative effect. Referring to last year’s buzzer-beater he said, “Following our crowd chanting ‘overrated’ at Pinnacle’s Nico Mannion, he scored 23 points in the 4th quarter and nearly led his team to victory.”

One of the biggest reasons Brophy students should be cheering rather than jeering is not because it motivates the opposing players, it is the essence of jeering itself. It is against the Ignatian philosophy to jeer.

When asked about what he thought about jeer, Mr. Patrick Higgins said, “If a Jesuit high school’s charism is to be counter-cultural we should be working against jeering and for cheering.”

Mr. Higgins also said, “I do not think that it should ever get personal, should ever get ugly, and should never be profane.” He went on to say, “I have always appreciated our student’s wit.”

So, when at the next Brophy sporting event, make sure to cheer for the Broncos rather than jeer at the opponent.

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