Opinions

Brophy students save face with make up

Illustration by Victor Beck ’20 | A young man is experimenting with lavish makeup

By Francisco Pastor ’20

THE ROUNDUP

It is time for Brophy and its dress code policy to update with the sign of the times. Brophy must be open to growth and allow its students to express their identity in whichever way they see fit.

During summer vacation, I experimented with my attire. For the very first time, I put on nail polish and wore it proudly. With the nail polish on, it made me feel more masculine.

I was confident and comfortable with my appearance.

I remember posting a picture of my nails on my social media accounts. My viewership skyrocketed and rumors about my style began to circulate among my classmates.

Some responded to my posts with encouraging words and terms of endearment, while others responded asking why I would do such a thing.

Popular media is seeing a trend in which men and women are becoming more androgynous and pushing the limits in feminity and masculinity, regardless of orientation.

For example, in the 80’s and 90’s, men began piercing their ears. A taboo that broke the norm for what we know today.

Likewise, traditionally tattoos have been reserved men but now it is common to see a woman with a full sleeve of artwork. In some cultures, tattoos are revered and are regarded as a symbol of status.

When we think of bands from our parent’s generations, we think of rock bands also known as “hair bands” for their coiffed and teased manes and long tresses.

Even today, with a more hip hop influence, we see many rappers and performers with more long braids. 20 years ago this would not have been as accepted as it is today, which brings me back to my point about makeup.

What is the big deal about guys wearing nail polish if it is a creative expression of individuality? There are many influencers that are sporting makeup and have been for a while.

Back in the early 2000’s, there is not a picture of famed NBA player, Dennis Rodman without nail polish or other makeup.

Today, we have performers like Bad Bunny, Frank Ocean, and athletes such as Russell Martin sporting brightly painted nails and wearing other forms of makeup.

Popular culture is changing and becoming more fluid in identity. The ways in which we define what it means to be a man or a woman are changing.

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