Examining the Exams

Audio Story: Flex periods increase student productivity
By AK Alilonu ’16 THE ROUNDUP The flex period became a part of the average student’s schedule this year, like it has at other high schools. Flex period replaces study halls that were hosted in the Information Commons, now the Innovation Commons. It is also an option to replace substitute teachers when a faculty member is out of class. Both members of the student body and the administration say that the move…
Filling in the blanks: Standardized Tests
This summer, George Washington University announced it was dropping SAT requirements for incoming freshmen. It was a change that raised eyebrows and sparked discussion, bucking a trend that has become institutionalized in the world of higher education. With GWU dropping its testing requirements and additional modifications to the most popular standardized tests, students and teachers alike are wondering what the future of standardized testing holds. This month, The Roundup takes…
‘Test Optional’ schools should lower stress of standardized testing
By Graham Armknecht ’18 THE ROUNDUP Brophy students’ fear over standardized testing is understandable, but with more schools taking a test optional approach, students should not stress as much. Even outside of the major college tests such as the SAT or ACT, students going into Brophy start with the High School Placement Test, or HSPT for short. “I remember being stressed out about the HSPT,” said Carson Mullins ‘19. “My…
Staff Editorial: Standardized testing should be optional, play smaller role in college admissions
Photo Illustration by Bryce Owen The Issue: Universities like George Washington University are eliminating standardized testing requirements for their admissions process. Our Stance: Standardized testing should be optional and should play less of a role in college admissions. Although standardized test scores certainly help colleges sift through the thousands of applications they receive a year, too great an emphasis on tests harms both students and administrators. In July of this…
Despite recent trends, testing still a big part of college admissions
By Anthony Cardellini ’17 & Cameron M. Bray ’16 THE ROUNDUP George Washington University, a school of about 25,000 students located in Washington D.C., announced July 27 that it had dropped its testing requirements for freshman admissions. High school applications can still submit SAT or ACT scores if they want, but it’s not a mandatory qualification for admission. With this move, GWU is joining the ranks of more than 125…
‘Flipped classroom’ continues to evolve, grow on campus
Photo illustration by Cameron Bray ’16  — Teachers adopted the flipped classroom model several years ago. It allows students to ask teachers for additional homework help while they cover the course material on their own time By Kaleb Lucero ’18 THE ROUNDUP The flipped classroom has been around for a while, and throughout that time both teachers and students have developed their own methods and opinions on dealing with this educational…
Students debate testing requirements in college admissions.
Optional standardized testing allows more students to enroll By Joseph Valencia ’17 THE ROUNDUP Standardized tests are supposed to act as a measurement of a student’s critical thinking skills, but scores don’t always accurately reflect true abilities. Universities are beginning to see this problem, and some have made the submission standardized test scores, such as the SAT and ACT, optional. For example, George Washington University’s administration recently decided that they…
Teachers, students weigh value of AP exam
By AK Alilonu ’16 THE ROUNDUP The Washington Examiner reported this summer that taking Advanced Placement exams barely helps your chances of college graduation.  The study it cited came from the National Bureau of Economic Research and was published May of last school year, when many students were taking these tests.  To some teachers, this was no surprise. “It’s a whole different ballgame in college,” said Mrs. Kristin Venberg. Mrs. Venberg teaches AP…
APUSH changes only minor, mostly technical
By Cameron M. Bray ’16 THE ROUNDUP Last year’s AP U.S. History changes were perhaps the most controversial educational development since the birth of the Common Core. The College Board changed the structure of the exam and the framework and modified the goals of the course, wanting a course that was more conceptual based rather than fact-memorization based. Across the country, conservative policymakers in Georgia, Texas, South Carolina, North Carolina,…