Prison

Students debate effectiveness of mandatory minimums
Mandatory minimums still effective By Gabe Morrison ’17 THE ROUNDUP As mandatory minimums become increasingly unpopular due to a worrisome number of cases in which people are over-sentenced, the concept still remains a viable idea, so long as they’re given fairly. Mandatory minimums are laws that require criminals to serve a predetermined, minimum amount of time in jail for their specific crime. Judges do not have the power to lower…
Death penalty fails to deter crime, stop criminals
By Cameron M. Bray ’16 THE ROUNDUP Capital punishment has to be one of mankind’s oldest institutions, dating back to the earliest civilizations thousands of years ago. The death penalty not only violates basic human dignity, but it also fails to deter crime. Moreover, the death penalty is impossible to administer humanely and, as recent exonerations based on DNA evidence show, it poses the tremendous risk that innocent prisoners will…
Status offenses offer both good, bad outcomes for teens under 18
By Jace Riley ’16 THE ROUNDUP Status offenses are a set of laws based on minors’ status of being a minor and most go away upon turning 18. Some examples are that minors can’t runaway from their house, can’t ditch school or be out past curfew. While I understand why these laws exist and most are reasonable, I can see some cases where they can be harmful. If a minor…
U.S. prison system fails to fix crime, reform prisoners
By Cameron M. Bray ’16 THE ROUNDUP Sadly, the United States has not had a particularly proud history when it comes to prisons and its correctional system, and we see this awful trend continue today. During the country’s early history, U.S. prison inmates faced unspeakably horrendous and miserable conditions, to say the least. “Corruption was rampant; prisoners were expected to bribe their keepers for minimally adequate treatment, and those without…