Sports

Dormant rugby club finds new life at Brophy

Alec Vick ’15
THE ROUNDUP

Since the first rugby match, the game has always been known as a “Gentleman’s Game.”

From the collars of the uniforms to the proud sportsmanship on and off the field, we see why rugby is called a gentleman’s game.

In 2010, the Brophy Rugby Club made its short debut on campus, which barely lasted for one year.

The revival of this club is underway and has many students exuberant on the possibilities.

Tim Moran, Uncle to current Brophy student Simon Moran ’15, will be the moderator/coach for this club.

Moran could not be reached for an interview about the club.

“I believe that if we can get a team together and work hard this will be another sport that Brophy can dominate at,” Simon said about his uncle’s idea.

The club is still in the early stages of its formation and will likely not be ready for student participation until second semester. Fifteen players are on the field for each team at one time.

Not many high schools have a rugby team as part of their athletic department, but with this club, Brophy may help change that.

“It is in its early stages of formation and will most likely start near the end of the year. My uncle is a decorated rugby player and continues to play to this day. There is a lot of interest in rugby from Brophy students; every day I have people asking me about it,” Moran said.

Rugby is played on a field similar to the field used in football and soccer, but with much different rules.

“I love rugby, it’s a lot like football just without pads and helmets. Im excited for the opportunity that Brophy gets to play rugby. I watch it on Tv and have always wanted to try it,” said Brophy student Michael Ryan ’15.

try is only scored when the player takes the ball across the goal line and grounds the ball. Grounding happens when the ball is on the ground and the player’s hand is on the ball. This “try” is worth five points.

goal is scored by kicking the ball between the uprights and above the crossbar of the goal posts. This goal is worth three points.

In each rugby match, 80 minutes are used in play. A match consists of two halves of 40 minutes each. It is controlled by a single referee on the field of play.

Also there are two assistant referees (touch judges), and in professional matches, a match official called the video referee who can use television replays to rule on a particular incident.

The object of the entire game is that each team scores as many points as possible. The team with the greater number of points when time is over wins the match.