Multimedia News The Soul of Brophy

Students debate Xavier, Brophy integration

Single-sex schools still offer some coed integration

By Colin Marston ’13
THE ROUNDUP

Brophy acts as an all-male institution but there are some instances of where boys from Brophy interact with Xavier girls.

There are many different classes that foster the integration of Xavier and Brophy classes, including the French department at Xavier, the Latin department at Brophy, and various  co-ed electives and fine arts courses offered to students at either school.

Students said positive remarks about the shared classrooms.

“It’s nice to have a break from an all girl’s environment partly because girls can get annoying after a while and also because of the incessant Xavier drama,” said Alex Chapel ’13, a Xavier sophomore in French II. “Boys don’t care about meticulous gossip, they’re pretty funny and give the classroom a laidback atmosphere.”

When asked if given the chance, would she enroll in Brophy?

“In a heartbeat,” Chapel said.

Angelo Rea ’13, a sophomore also in French II, said otherwise.

“I value the Brophy feeling of brotherhood, and I feel like more Xavier influence would mess that up,” Rea said.

Anais Chrzan teaches French II at Xavier.

“The exchange between Brophy and Xavier makes the schools unique. They both foster excellence in a single-sex environment, yet they are flexible enough to do what is best for their students,” Mrs. Chrzan said.

“With the partnership, our schools are able to offer so many more opportunities, subjects and chances to learn that it is a true privilege to be a part of it,” she said.

She saw mostly beneficial Brophy contributions to her classroom.

“The Brophy boys definitely bring a sense of humor and spontaneity to the classroom” she said.

“The dynamics in class are very different when there is no exchange.”

Mrs. Chrzan said overall keeping the schools separate is best, but greater cooperation should be encouraged.

“Single-sex education is the way to go: less social pressure, less distraction, nothing to worry about besides classes, supporting girls and boys to become who they are outside of stereotypes, and a more homogeneous maturity level,” she said.

“However, sharing activities and some classes allow our students to value their time together and spend it on learning from one another,” she added.

Another Xavier class with a Brophy student presence is All That Jazz, Pop and Rock.

Tom Kurth ’13 said he would prefer a more radical vision than the one Mrs. Chrzan offered.

“It would be awesome if we could just join (schools) completely,” Kurth said. “Girls are intelligent, they’re funny, and…they’re girls. I see no negative consequences.”